3D Printed Ceramics Without a Binder

Starting from a Nanopowder, Using a Direct Coagulation Printing Method

Opportunity

Available for Licensing

IP Status

PCT Patent Pending: WO 2020/069351 A2

Inventors

Tucker Hensen
Troy Holland

Technology Overview

Researchers at Colorado State University have created the first system capable of 3D printing ceramics without a binder, starting from a nanopowder, using a direct coagulation printing method and an extrusion delivery system. This development makes the process more time and energy efficient and is less prone to impurities.

 

Licensing Director

Mandana Ashouri
Mandana.Ashouri@colostate.edu
970-491-7100

Reference No.: 17-076

Background

Traditional manufacture of ceramics with subtractive methods is limited due to their hardness and brittleness, inevitably leading to ceramic parts with less-than-optimal geometries. With an additive manufacturing approach, ceramic parts with complex 3D geometries (such as overhands and/or hollow enclosures) become possible. Current art utilizes nanometric precursor powders (such as for slip and tape casting or abrasive polishing) to drastically improve mechanical and electrical properties.

 

Benefits
  • Improved sinterability (>97%)
  • Improved flexural strength
  • Ability to print virtually any ceramic or metal in nanopowder without binders
  • More time and energy efficient
  • Less prone to impurities
  • Can print in ambient atmosphere
  • Resolution as low as 400 micron
Applications
  • Heat exchangers
  • Condensers
  • Biomedical implants
  • Chemical reactant vessels
  • Electrical isolation applications

Last updated: May 2020