Novel Therapeutic Compounds for the Treatment of Pneumonic Infections

Opportunity

Available for Licensing

IP Status

US Utility Patent Pending (Not Yet Published)

Inventors

​Brad Borlee
Dean Crick
Nurul Islam

At A Glance

Researchers at Colorado State University have developed novel therapeutic compounds for patients with chronic pneumonic infections of the lungs.

The use of prolonged antibiotic therapy against pathogens such as these has shown to be ineffective at eradication, does not stop the production of virulence factors that damage host tissue, and leads to antibiotic resistance. Our research has indicated that the therapeutic compounds developed here inhibit growth and have the potential to stop virulence factor production. Furthermore, these compounds may have the ability to abrogate development of resistance due to the essentiality of the specific bacterial metabolic site targeted here.

These compounds have the potential to be administered through a nebulized formula so as to deliver the compounds directly to the sight of infection. Other formulations could be used as topical treatments, or coatings applied to medical devices that often become contaminated during use for intubation.

For more details, please contact our office!

Licensing Director

Steve Foster
Steve.Foster@colostate.edu
970-491-7100

Reference No.: 2021-027

Background

Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia are common pathogens in nosocomial infections and are an issue for burn victims, immunocompromised hosts or patients with cystic fibrosis or diabetes. Burkholderia pseudomallei (a causative agent of melioidosis) causes an often-fatal disease that starts as a pneumonic infection leading to dissemination and sepsis. Each of these pathogens are Gram-negative bacteria pathogens and environmental saprophytes found in soils and surface waters in endemic regions that are difficult to treat with current antibiotic therapies. Each can cause pneumonia or contaminate medical devices during hospital-acquired infection.

Current interventions rely on host directed therapies (CFTR correctors) which are cost prohibitive and only available to the very few that can afford them. Furthermore, the use of prolonged antibiotic therapy has shown to be ineffective at the eradication of such pathogens and does not stop the production of virulence factors that damage host tissue.

Benefits
  • Inhibits the growth of such lung pathogens
  • potential to stop virulence factor production
  • ability to abrogate development of resistance
Applications
  • Treatment chronic pneumonic infections
  • Treatment of lung infections in cystic fibrosis
  • Development of therapeutics pertaining to Pneumonic lung infection

Last updated: July 2021

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