Rapid Diagnostic Test for Superficial Fungal Infections

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Opportunity

Available for Licensing

IP Status

US Utility Patent Pending

Inventors

Susan VandeWoude
Alexandra Moskaluk
Benjamin Shupe
Mary Nehring

At A Glance
  • This novel diagnostic tool uses sulphite production from fungi to detect low levels of active infections such as ringworm and athlete’s foot within 1 hour
  • Current diagnostic tools, such as PCR and microscopy, are costly and can take several days to 3 weeks to complete
  • Veterinary clinics will be able to diagnose common animal fungal infections on-site; this product can also be used at home to diagnose human fungal infections
Licensing Director

Steve Foster
Steve.Foster@colostate.edu
970-491-7100

Reference No.: 2019-080

The Problem

Fungal infections regularly occur in both pets and humans, and infection rates are on the rise in some countries, such as India, Kenya, and South Africa. These infections can be very irritating, and lead to lesions if left untreated. Due to their ability to easily spread, rapid diagnosis and treatment of infection is needed. Current diagnostic tests to confirm the presence of active fungal infections are confounded by several factors, including low sensitivity, false positives, requirement of experienced lab technicians, and a long time to diagnose the patient.

The Solution

Researchers at Colorado State University have developed a novel colorimetric diagnostic tool to rapidly identify a broad spectrum of fungal infections. This test uses the presence of sulphite produced by many different fungal infections to change the color of a special solution. This reaction occurs within 1 hour, and can be used by veterinarians, primary doctors, or the patients themselves. This diagnostic method is much more sensitive than current tools, allowing for earlier detection and treatment.

Benefits
  • Greater sensitivity than current products
  • Takes only 1 hour to diagnose, compared to days with standard procedures
  • Diagnosis can be performed both in the clinic and at home

Last updated on October 7, 2019.